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Whittlesey and District Neighbourhood Watch

Whittlesey and District Neighbourhood Watch

Creating safer, stronger and active communities

whittlesey

The police are releasing photographs of thousands of items of property recovered as part of an investigation into a prolific crime gang. They hope to reunite the items, which are believed to have come from crimes in Cambridgeshire and surrounding counties between 9 December 2016 and 9 January 2018, with their rightful owners.

Last month, the gang members were sentenced to a total of 71 years in jail. They had committed more than 200 burglaries, including nearly 100 in Cambridgeshire, costing victims more than £2 million pounds. Gang members would mask their faces using balaclavas and smash or force open doors or windows in broad daylight. They would steal specific items, mainly high-powered BMWs and Audis, firearms, cash and jewellery, all of which they could dispose of through contacts. Norfolk suffered a similar number of burglaries to Cambridgeshire while other offences took place in Suffolk, Essex and Bedfordshire. The images can be viewed here https://www.flickr.com/photos/ophawksbury/

Those who believe an item belongs to them should email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with their name, date and address of offence, crime number, exhibit number/album-photo ref of property, contact details, including email address, and any receipts/proof of purchase or photographs of items.

For more on the sentencing of the crime gang visit our website here https://www.cambs.police.uk/news-and-appeals/burglary-conspiracy-jail-Norwich 

 

 

 

Spoofed Emails from Amazon

Action Fraud has received several reports from victims who have been sent convincing looking emails claiming to be from Amazon. The spoofed emails from “This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.claim recipients have made an order online and mimic an automatic customer email notification.  
The scam email claims recipients have ordered an expensive vintage chandelier. Other reported examples include: Bose stereos, iPhone’s and luxury watches. 

The emails cleverly state that if recipients haven’t authorised the transaction they can click on the help centre link to receive a full refund. The link leads to an authentic-looking website, which asks victims to confirm their name, address, and bank card information.

Amazon says that suspicious e-mails will often contain:

  • Links to websites that look like Amazon.co.uk, but aren't Amazon.co.uk.
  • Attachments or prompts to install software on your computer.
  • Typos or grammatical errors.
  • Forged (or spoofed) e-mail addresses to make it look like the e-mail is coming from Amazon.co.uk.

Amazon will never ask for personal information to be supplied by e-mail. You can read more aboutidentifying suspicious emailsclaiming to be from Amazon by visiting this site
To report a fraud or cyber crime, call us on 0300 123 2040.